Food/Nutrition Bloopers from Restaurants,
Food Companies, Web sites and News Media

The following are actual quotes or observations (the latest entries are at the top). Click for our comments. Some of these errors/misinformation have been subsequently corrected by their source and some have not.

High ORAC Score vs. Antioxidant Claim

A new juice containing goji and soursop juices is advertised as "High ORAC... High Anti-Oxidants" ... made from berries "rich in ... beta-carotene." In addition, the website claims the juice can "fight malignant cells," and provide other health benefits.

Front of Package Claims - Anything Goes?

A senior nutrition editor is quoted as saying that food manufacturers "can put... any kind of claims that they want" on the front of a food package (anywhere but in the Nutrition Facts panel), because those areas are not regulated.

"35 Calorie" Popcorn

A line of popcorn snacks has two that give the number of calories per cup on the front of package (35 calories and 37 calories), and describes them as "mind-boggling" and "svelte."

Dietitian's Dollar Menu (Mis)Picks

A dietitian recommends against ordering the oatmeal ("full of sugar") on a fast food chain's breakfast menu, but favors the fruit and yogurt parfait on the lunch menu. She also says the cheddar burger is better than another cheese burger because the cheese is "less processed."

Palm Oil - High in Vitamins?

A news article on the growth in production/sales of palm oil states that it provides high doses of certain vitamins.

OJ High in Potassium and Good Source of Calcium?

An online article lists 15 foods high in potassium; says orange juice is also a good source of calcium...

Potatoes Promoted for Calcium

An article by a physician recommends potatoes as a source of calcium.

Kohlrabi Promoted as a Superfood

A Web article declares kohlrabi the new superfood.

Nutrients in (and not in) Leafy Greens

A nutritionist/RD blogs that leafy greens are a "great" source of omega-3 and vitamin E.

Use of "Healthy" Claim for Granola

The web site for a granola product describes it as “healthy” and full of various nutrients from each ingredient.

Yogurt vs Kefir

A health writer for various magazines compares yogurt to kefir, and says a serving of kefir has 3 g fiber while yogurt has none.

Health Benefits of Pasta?

An online health article extols upon the inflammation/insulin/heart benefits of antioxidants in pasta.

Claims on Web Site Unsupported

The manufacturer’s web site and other sites that sell their snack bar advertise it as low in sodium, high in protein and low in sugar, in addition to making other claims. 

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